Clinical Studies for Chronic Pain

Oct 19, 2015

Diabetic peripheral neuropathy [DPN] is caused by diabetes-related damage to the nerves (neuropathy), mainly in the feet, and sometimes in the legs and the hands. It affects more than 3 million Americans and is leading cause of nerve damage-associated pain (neuropathic pain) worldwide. Currently approved drugs such as gabapentin, pregabalin, and duloxetine provide pain relief only in 1 out of 4 or 5 people with DPN.

If you are suffering from peripheral neuropathy in your legs and feet as a result of diabetes, you may be eligible to participate in a study that is taking place in the Pain Center.  The purpose of this study is to evaluate a new treatment approach for painful diabetic peripheral neuropathy.

Your participation would include the study drug at no cost and about three visits to the Pain Management Center over a period of four to five weeks.  Compensation for your time and travel may be provided.  To qualify, you must be a diabetic who is at least 18 years old and have had pain in your feet and/or lower legs for three months or longer.

 

Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy (CIPN) is a common complication of certain types of cancer chemotherapy drugs – for example oxaliplatin or paclitaxel.  Painful CIPN mainly affects the feet and the hands, can be quite debilitating and treatment-resistant. We are looking for people who suffer from painful neuropathy caused by chemotherapy.

The purpose of the study is to evaluate a new treatment approach for CIPN. Your participation would include the study drug at no cost and about four visits to the Pain Center over a period of ten weeks.  Compensation for your time and travel may be provided.  To qualify, you must be at least 18 years old, have had receives certain type(s) of chemotherapy for cancer, and have had pain in your feet and/or hands for two months or longer.

 

Finally, our research group is performing a study where we investigate the underlying mechanisms of a certain type of chronic pain that occurs after someone has a stroke – a condition called “Central Post-Stroke Pain” – CPSP. Determining the pain mechanisms is expected to lead to new treatment approaches for this disabling painful condition. We are looking for stroke survivors who suffer from chronic pain in one (or more) extremities as a result of the stroke. Your participation would include a single intervention visit to the Pain Center.  Compensation for your time and travel may be provided.

Choosing to participate in a study is an important personal decision. Talk with your doctor and family members or friends about deciding to join a study. To learn more about our Pain Center studies please contact Karen Frey at 314-454-5980.

To learn more about Washington University’s clinical trials click here.